Automotive Digital Marketing ProCom

Professional Community for Car Dealers, Automotive Marketers and Sales Managers

Loading... Be Patient!

Which Should You Choose: Adaptive or Responsive Design?


John Loschky, Sr. Mobile Product Manager
by John Loschky, Sr. Mobile Product Manager

The buzzwords are plentiful when discussing mobile optimization. We’ve heard them all. “Adaptive” and “Responsive” typically generate more of the noise. Have you stopped to consider what they actually mean? More importantly, how do they influence the experiences that we create for our customers?

So, what are the fundamental differences between these debated design patterns?

Responsive:

  • Single template that is fluid and changes to fit requesting screen
  • Slower load times may be encountered
  • Supportive of SEO strategies

Adaptive:

  • Typically distinct templates for desktop, tablet and smartphone
  • Typically, quicker page load time
  • Supportive of SEO strategies

These design patterns are important, and selection of either design approach is better than doing nothing. But to suggest one is better than the other is a bit short sighted for a variety of reasons.

Ideally, your dealership website should apply elements of both design patterns to create a mobile site that provides an engaging experience for consu....

But deciding between Responsive, Adaptive or a combination of the two only addresses part of the challenge in creating meaningful cross-device experiences for car shoppers. The process of building your multi-screen strategy needs to be far more strategic than simply focusing on tactical decisions like Adaptive vs. Responsive.

A well-designed multi-screen strategy needs to focus on what really matters in creating mobile experiences:


But deciding between Responsive, Adaptive or a combination of the two only addresses part of the challenge in creating meaningful cross-device experiences for car shoppers. The process of building your multi-screen strategy needs to be far more strategic than simply focusing on tactical decisions like Adaptive vs. Responsive.

A well-designed multi-screen strategy needs to focus on what really matters in creating mobile experiences:

  • Building for device functions and screen sizes. This means supporting actions such as using a mouse to configure a vehicle on your desktop, swiping to review your inventory on tablets and touch gestures to call the dealership on mobile devices. Your multi-screen strategy needs to consider how these actions impact the consumer’s car shopping experience on various devices.
  • Creating for explicit tasks through strong visual design. This is one of the most important features in a multi-screen strategy. Good design influences a consumer’s perception of your brand. It can be as simple as images that have good text to image contrast and font sizes that are readable across devices.
  • Pushing a balanced content strategy to engage consumers. You’ve heard of less is more. Speaking of image rotator assets again, your image should evoke emotion. Too much copy can get in the way of that emotional response. So keep the text brief. A good rule of thumb for your hero rotator images is to ask yourself if consumers will be able to retain the message after a 3 second scan regardless of the device they use.Save all the details about the promotion for the landing page. This applies across devices so that you provide a consistent shopping experience for consumers.
  • Leveraging data to continually evolve and improve the consumer experience.Measuring performance and optimizing the mobile experience are critical. We all have been to slow mobile sites. You either reload or go back to Google to click on another search result. You need to continuously look at how consumers engage with your mobile sites so that you can alter the content and experience to best drive conversion and VIN activity and improve your website’s overall performance.

Each of these initiatives represents the smart approach in creating multi-screen experiences. As Maximiliano Firtman mentions in his article, You May Be Losing Users If Responsive Web Design Is Your Only Mobile Strategy, “When you set responsive design as a goal, it becomes easy to lose perspective. The ultimate goal for a website should be ‘happy users, which will lead to more conversions and (engagement).”

Think about the website experiences your customers expect from your dealership. Ask yourselves these three simple questions:

  • What kind of experience are you creating for your car shoppers across devices?
  • Are you driving towards performance?
  • Do you have a multi-screen strategy in place?

Focus on the larger story and you will quickly be identified as a market leader, innovator and a dealership to do business with.

Are you unknowingly alienating shoppers and sabotaging your inventory? Find out what it takes to properly reach car shoppers across devices with our webinar, So Many Screens, So Little Time. 


Featured Webinar

So Many Screens, So Little Time


This next-level webinar will challenge you to start looking at mobile from a new perspective. John will explore the difference between displaying your website successfully on various devices and shaping a consumer experience that is relevant, meaningful and actionable.
Watch Webinar

About the Author

John Loschky, Sr. Mobile Product Manager at Cobalt John Loschky is the Senior Mobile Product Manager at Cobalt with over 15 years of experience developing unique and compelling mobile applications and services. He has extensively led product and program efforts through the mobile value chain including the mobile operator, content development/aggregation and monetization. Prior to joining Cobalt, John managed programs for one of the largest messaging platforms in North America and co-managed a mobile video service with one of the largest television producers in the world. John also worked at AT&T Wireless, where he launched the industry’s first wireless advertising network, led the program development for the text messaging application used on American Idol and was the lead product manager for the first youth targeted mobile device developed there. Give him a shout at loschkj@cobalt.com.

Views: 27

Tags: SEO, adaptive, dealer, desktop, many, mobile, multi-screen, responsive, screens, so, More…strategy, websites

Comment

Oops... You need to stop "Lurking" on ADM and become a more genuine Automotive Professional by completing your membership registration. As a registered ADM Member, you can post comments, publish your own articles (be a star!) and start Forum discussions. Stop being an online "Peeping Tom" and JOIN ADM RIGHT NOW!

Join Automotive Digital Marketing ProCom

Comment by Alexander Lau on September 4, 2014 at 4:34pm

Additionally, CSS frameworks like Bootstrap, Foundation and Skeleton are being constantly updated and that only benefits the likes of RWD. It's only a matter of time before many of the issues that cause minor glitches in RWD sites are fixed, such as far too large CSS files being reduced on load, etc. It's out there now actually...http://www.sitepoint.com/complete-guide-reducing-page-weight. Pre-processors such as Sass, LESS and Stylus can do the hard work for you. Build tools including Grunt.js or Gulp can automate your workflow or, if you'd prefer a GUI, Koala provides a free cross-platform application, etc.

Comment by Alexander Lau on September 4, 2014 at 4:34pm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-rampton/business-mobile-responsi...

But why does Google prefer responsive design? For starters, it's more efficient for Google to bot crawl the site and then index and organize all the content that is online. The reason for this is that with responsive design, all sites have just one URL and the same HTML across all devices. When a business has both a mobile site and desktop site, there will be a different URL and different HTML for each. This forces Google to crawl and index multiple versions of the same exact site.

Also, when there is just one website and URL, it's much easier for users to share, engage and interact with the content on that site as compared to a site that has different pages for mobile and desktop users. Google is a fan of that as well. Why? Because what if someone shared a mobile site on a social media outlet and one of their connections viewed that mobile site on their desktop? That viewer would then be viewing a less than optimal site because it was intended for mobile. This makes the user unhappy.

Comment by Alexander Lau on September 4, 2014 at 4:33pm

No offense, but you're late to the game and I know from being on other forums you've posted this a bunch of times. Rather do a search for the long discussion we had on this subject about two months ago @http://www.drivingsales.com/blogs/carpursuit/2014/07/16/why-respons... posted by an uniformed individual.

You should mention the fact that Google suggest you use it and it's better for SEO, especially Mobile SEO.

We just launched a bunch of them @ http://hendersonkia.com, http://courtesyimports.com, http://countoncourtesymazda.com, http://hendersonmitsubishi.com.

ADMPC is a Network for Car Dealers, Automotive Marketing, Advertising and Management Pros sharing Digital Strategies and Execution Tactics.

Please Consider Automotive Marketing Professional Community Sponsors

ADM Badge

Loading…

Based On Your Interests...

Onsite/Offsite Combination ADM Consulting & Coaching
Select the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for

Automotive Marketing Tools

Get ADM Toolbar

Click here to take the ADM Member Survey

 

Google Automotive Network Targeted Placement Ads

Getting too many emails from ADM? Click mailbox below to control which types of alerts and updates you are sent......


Instagram

Share the Best Content w/AutoMarketing Community

© 2014   Created by Ralph Paglia.

ADM Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service