Automotive Digital Marketing

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Glossary

Digital Marketing, Advertising, Performance Metrics & Conversion Optimization Glossary

Below is a list of common terms, jargon and acronyms that are frequently used in our crazy little industry (Digital Marketing). We’ve done our best to define each term for you. If you would like to suggest a new word to add to this glossary, please enter a detailed statement in the comment section at the bottom of this page...

A

Anchor Text: The text (or characters) inside a website hyperlink.

B

Bandit Testing: A term used to describe test methods or algorithms that continuously shift traffic in reaction to the real-time performance of the test.

Banner Blindness: A term used in online advertising to describe the ineffectiveness of banner advertisements due to their oversaturation and lack of intent-based messaging.

Bounce Rate: The bounce rate is the percentage of people who landed on your website, but instead of browsing further, they exited your website.

Black Hat SEO: In search engine optimization (SEO) terminology, black hat SEO refers to the use of aggressive SEO strategies, techniques and tactics that focus only on search engines and not a human audience, and usually does not obey search engines guidelines.

Blog: The term "blog" is a truncation of the expression "weblog")[1] and is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries ("posts"). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual,[citation needed] occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media. Blog can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog. The emergence and growth of blogs in the late 1990s coincided with the advent of web publishing tools that facilitated the posting of content by non-technical users who did not have much experience with HTML or computer programming. Previously, a knowledge of such technologies as HTML and File Transfer Protocol had been required to publish content on the Web, and as such, early Web users tended to be hackers and computer enthusiasts. In the 2010s, the majority are interactive Web 2.0 websites, allowing visitors to leave online comments, and it is this interactivity that distinguishes them from other static websites.[2] In that sense, blogging can be seen as a form of social networking service. Indeed, bloggers do not only produce content to post on their blogs, but also often build social relations with their readers and other bloggers.[3] However, there are high-readership blogs which do not allow comments.

C

Call to Action: A call to action (abbreviated “CTA”) is the desired action a user or visitor is supposed to take at a certain stage of the conversion funnel.

Confidence Interval: A range of values calculated such that there is a known probability that the true mean of a parameter lies within it.

Confidence Level: The percentage of time that a statistical result would be correct if you took numerous random samples.

Content Marketing: A strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.

D

Digital Marketing: Digital marketing is the marketing of products or services using digital technologies, mainly on the Internet, but also including mobile phones, display advertising, and any other digital medium. Digital marketing's development since the 1990s and 2000s has changed the way brands and businesses use technology for marketing.[2] As digital platforms are increasingly incorporated into marketing plans and everyday life,[3] and as people use digital devices instead of visiting physical shops,[4][5] digital marketing campaigns are becoming more prevalent and efficient.

Domain Authority: A 1-100 score predicting how well a site will rank in major search engines.

Duplicate Content (SEO): In SEO (search engine optimization) terminology, it is content (or text) that has been copied or reused from other Web pages. Duplicate content is often used to help boost keyword density, however some search engines, including Google, filters duplicate text and may penalize your site, resulting in a lower keyphrase position, when you use duplicate content.

E

Earned Media: Earned media (often regarded as free media) attributes the publicity of your brand to the recognition of its efforts and results.

G

Guerilla Marketing: Guerrilla marketing is a form of marketing that utilizes unconventional tactics to get maximum results when promoting a business or service. Ralph Paglia is widely recognized as one of the most experienced and creative Guerilla Marketers in the auto industry.

H

Hyperlinks: In computing, a hyperlink, or simply a link, is a reference to data that the reader can directly follow either by clicking, tapping, or hovering. A hyperlink points to a whole document or to a specific element within a document. Hypertext is text with hyperlinks. The text that is linked from is called anchor text. A software system that is used for viewing and creating hypertext is a hypertext system, and to create a hyperlink is to hyperlink (or simply to link). A user following hyperlinks is said to navigate or browse the hypertext. Tim Berners-Lee saw the possibility of using hyperlinks to link any information to any other information over the Internet. Hyperlinks were therefore integral to the creation of the World Wide Web. Web pages are written in the hypertext mark-up language HTML. This is what a hyperlink to the home page of the W3C organization could look like in HTML code:
<a href="http://www.w3.org">W3C organization website</a>

I

Influencer MarketingInfluencer marketing (also influence marketing) is a form of marketing in which focus is placed on influential people rather than the target market as a whole. It identifies the individuals that have influence over potential buyers, and orients marketing activities around these influencers. Alternately, Influencer marketing is the activity of engaging with influential people in order to obtain press and/or get content disseminated to large audiences.

L

Link Juice: Link juice is a non-technical SEO term used to reference the SEO value of a hyperlink to a particular website or webpage.

M

Margin of Error: An expression for the maximum expected difference between the true population parameter and a sample estimate of that parameter.

Marketing Automation: Marketing Automation is a tool, or a suite of tools, that enables the automation of repetitive tasks across several channels.

Multivariate Testing: A type of hypothesis testing where multiple variables are tested simultaneously to determine how the variables and combinations of variables influence the output.

S

Sample Size: The number (n) of observations taken from a population through which statistical inferences for the whole population are made.

(Organic) SEO: Organic SEO (search engine optimization) is the phrase used to describe processes to obtain a natural placement on organic search engine results pages (SERPs). Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of affecting the online visibility of a website or a web page in a web search engine's unpaid results—often referred to as "natural", "organic", or "earned" results. In general, the earlier (or higher ranked on the search results page), and more frequently a website appears in the search results list, the more visitors it will receive from the search engine's users; these visitors can then be converted into customers.[1] SEO may target different kinds of search, including image search, video search, academic search,[2] news search, and industry-specific vertical search engines. SEO differs from local search engine optimization in that the latter is focused on optimizing a business' online presence so that its web pages will be displayed by search engines when a user enters a local search for its products or services. The former instead is more focused on national or international searches.

Spider: A spider is a software program that travels the Web (hence the name "spider"), locating and indexing websites for search engines. All the major search engines, such as Google and Yahoo!, use spiders to build and update their indexes. These programs constantly browse the Web, traveling from one hyperlink to another.

T

The Fold: The fold is a term used by web designers and Internet marketers to describe a web browser window’s bottom border.

U

Unique Selling Proposition (USP): A unique characteristic of a product or brand identified by the marketer as the one on which to base a promotional campaign; often used in a product differentiation approach to promotion.

V

Value Proposition: A value proposition is what you guarantee or promise to deliver to your consumers in exchange for their money.

Vanity Metric: A metric that makes you feel good without telling you anything about your business.

W

Web Spam: Intentional attempts to manipulate search engine rankings for specific keywords or keyword phrase queries.

White Hat SEO: In search engine optimization (SEO) terminology, white hat SEO refers to the usage of optimization strategies, techniques and tactics that focus on a human audience opposed to search engines and completely follows search engine rules and policies.

Wikis: While wikis may use HTML-type hyperlinks, the use of wiki markup, a set of lightweight markup languages specifically for wikis, provides simplified syntax for linking pages within wiki environments—in other words, for creating wikilinks. The syntax and appearance of wikilinks may vary. Ward Cunningham's original wiki software, the WikiWikiWeb used CamelCase for this purpose. CamelCase was also used in the early version of Wikipedia and is still used in some wikis, such as TiddlyWiki, Trac, and PmWiki. A common markup syntax is the use of double square brackets around the term to be wikilinked. For example, the input "[[zebras]]" will be converted by wiki software using this markup syntax to a link to a zebras article. Hyperlinks used in wikis are commonly classified as follows:

  • Internal wikilinks or intrawiki links lead to pages within the same wiki website.
  • Interwiki links are simplified markup hyperlinks that lead to pages of other wikis that are associated with the first.
  • External links lead to other webpages (those not covered in the above two cases, wiki or not wiki).

Wikilinks are visibly distinct from other text, and if an internal wikilink leads to a page that does not yet exist, it usually has a different specific visual appearance. For example, in Wikipedia wikilinks are displayed in blue, except those which link to pages which do not yet exist, which are instead shown in red.[3] Another possibility for linking is to display a highlighted clickable question mark after the wikilinked term.

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